manafromheaven

mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

artofabrooklynboy:

GODDAMN IT TUMBLR, CAN YOU AT LEAST GIVE US THEIR NAMES?!?!?

  1. Ching Shih was a prominent pirate in middle Qing China, who terrorized the China Sea in the early 19th century. She commanded over 300 junks manned by 20,000 to 40,000 pirates[2] another estimate has Cheng’s fleet at 1800 and crew at about 80,000[3][4]— men, women, and even children. She challenged the empires of the time, such as the British, Portuguese and the Qing dynasty. Undefeated, she would become one of China and Asia’s strongest pirates, and one of world history’s most powerful pirates. She was also one of the few pirate captains to retire from piracy.
  2. Nancy Wake (one of the few white women on this list; of course you put her name on the graphic…)
  3. Lyudmila Pavlichenko
  4. Rukhsana Kausar
  5. The Gulabi gang (gulabi is Hindi for “pink”) was founded by Sampat Pal Devi, a mother of five and former government health worker (as well as a former child bride), as a response to widespread domestic abuse and other violence against women.[3]Gulabis visit abusive husbands and threaten to beat them with laathis (sticks) unless they stop abusing their wives. Al Jazeera reports there are 400,000 members across Northern India.
  6. Neejra Bhanot was just 22 when terrorists from the Abu Nidal Organization hijacked Pan Am Flight 73, where she was the senior flight purser. After 17 hours (and yes, hiding American passports to protect those passengers), when the hijackers opened fire and set off explosives, Bhanot opened the emergency door and helped a number of passengers escape. She could have been the first to jump out when she opened the door but she decided not and was shot while shielding three children from a hail of bullets. Bhanot was recognized internationally as “the heroine of the hijack” and is the youngest recipient of the Ashok Chakra Award, India’s most prestigious gallantry award for bravery during peace time.
  7. Zainab Bibi, 42, allegedly told authorities she killed her husband Ahmad Abbas because he tried to sexually assault her 17-year-old daughter from another marriage.
  8. In September 2006, Susan Kuhnhausen found an intruder in her southeast Portland, OR home. “I saw a man step out of the shadows and he began to hit me in the head and the face with a hammer,” said Kuhnhausen. “I got the hammer and started hitting him with the hammer several times. My father, the carpenter, always taught me a hammer could be used for self defense — the claw end would work the best,” said Kuhnhausen. Kuhnhausen’s husband, Michael, had hired Ed Haffey to kill his wife.
  9. Seriously, fuck this one. The photo is of Parinya Chareonphol or Nong Thoom who is a kathoey, which many Thai believe to be a third gender (as opposed to the Western idea of ‘transgender’.) After a short time as a Buddhist monk, she took up Muy Thai kickboxing to support her parents and make enough money to pay for her sex-reassignment surgery, and basically kicked ass at it for several years. She was not “constantly made fun of before fights;” the Muy Thai community embraced her and her presence greatly revitalized both media and public interest in the sport, as shown by increased ticket sales and stadium revenue. The movie Beautiful Boxer was made about her, and she has recently acted in Mercury Man as well as continuing to kickbox. So yeah, fuck this one hard.
  10. Juliane Diller née Koepcke was the only survivor of the LANSA Flight 508 crash in 1971. Despite sustaining a broken collar bone, a deep gash to her right arm, a concussion and an eye injury in the fall, she was able to trek through the dense Amazon jungle for 10 days, until she was rescued by local lumbermen, who subsequently took her by canoe back to civilization. It was later discovered that as many as 14 other passengers also survived the initial fall from the disintegrated plane but were unable to seek help and died while awaiting rescue.

Seriously, guys, this took me like 20 minutes using Google and Wikipedia. These women are real people with real names and real stories. Please don’t reduce them to a picture (most of which came from Wikipedia in the first place oh my god i know you were there) and an “uplifting” story.

Look at these kickass women, and remember their names!!

They are so damn raw

teawitch
fuckyeahpaganism:

Rán is the Norse goddess of storms, and the wife of the sea god Aegir. She rules over the realm of the dead which is situated on the bottom of the ocean. She sinks ships and collects drowned sailors in her nets and takes them to her hall where she tenderly ministers them (drowned persons neither go to Valhalla nor to Helheim). With Aegir she is the mother of nine daughters (their names are poetic terms for different characteristics of waves), who wore white robes and veils. Sailors often carried gold or other jewels in case their boat sunk to offer and please the goddess. 
Photo Cred: Elisabeth Alba 

fuckyeahpaganism:

Rán is the Norse goddess of storms, and the wife of the sea god Aegir. She rules over the realm of the dead which is situated on the bottom of the ocean. She sinks ships and collects drowned sailors in her nets and takes them to her hall where she tenderly ministers them (drowned persons neither go to Valhalla nor to Helheim). With Aegir she is the mother of nine daughters (their names are poetic terms for different characteristics of waves), who wore white robes and veils. Sailors often carried gold or other jewels in case their boat sunk to offer and please the goddess. 

Photo Cred: Elisabeth Alba 

blpak
letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”

Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.

Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.

While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”

Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”

To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

typingsdrawings
lmangueart:

thejunglenook:

scienceyoucanlove:

As a 19-year-old sophomore at Stanford, Elizabeth Holmes decided to transform diagnostic medicine so she dropped out of college and used her tuition money to start her own company, Theranos. Ten years later, Holmes, pictured here holding a micro-vial, is on the cutting edge of medical technology — her new blood testing method allows hundreds of tests to be run using only a few drops of blood. And, Holmes’ methods are cheaper, faster, more accurate, and less invasive than conventional methods which often require a separate vial of blood for every test.As Holmes told Wired.com earlier this year, “I started this company because I wanted to spend my life changing our health care system. When someone you love gets really sick, most of the time when you find out, it’s too late to be able to do something about it. It’s heartbreaking… We wanted to make actionable health information accessible to people everywhere at the time it matters most. That means two things: being able to detect conditions in time to do something about them and providing access to information that can empower people to improve their lives.”
read more from A Mighty Girl

Reasons you should adore Elizabeth Holmes:
She is featured as Forbes’ youngest self-made woman billionaire.
Her tests will revolutionize the public health world as we know it; Making diagnostic testing accessible and affordable for more people (and potentially saving Medicare and Medicaid ~$100 billion each over the next decade). (x)
She is a coauthor on 82 US and 189 foreign patent applications. (x)
Her fear of needles served as a motivator for launching Theranos. (x)

Fantastic! <3

lmangueart:

thejunglenook:

scienceyoucanlove:

As a 19-year-old sophomore at Stanford, Elizabeth Holmes decided to transform diagnostic medicine so she dropped out of college and used her tuition money to start her own company, Theranos. Ten years later, Holmes, pictured here holding a micro-vial, is on the cutting edge of medical technology — her new blood testing method allows hundreds of tests to be run using only a few drops of blood. And, Holmes’ methods are cheaper, faster, more accurate, and less invasive than conventional methods which often require a separate vial of blood for every test.

As Holmes told Wired.com earlier this year, “I started this company because I wanted to spend my life changing our health care system. When someone you love gets really sick, most of the time when you find out, it’s too late to be able to do something about it. It’s heartbreaking… We wanted to make actionable health information accessible to people everywhere at the time it matters most. That means two things: being able to detect conditions in time to do something about them and providing access to information that can empower people to improve their lives.”

read more from A Mighty Girl

Reasons you should adore Elizabeth Holmes:

  • She is featured as Forbes’ youngest self-made woman billionaire.
  • Her tests will revolutionize the public health world as we know it; Making diagnostic testing accessible and affordable for more people (and potentially saving Medicare and Medicaid ~$100 billion each over the next decade). (x)
  • She is a coauthor on 82 US and 189 foreign patent applications. (x)
  • Her fear of needles served as a motivator for launching Theranos. (x)

Fantastic! <3

burdge
alliebirdseed:

All done!
I was so excited to get the tape off this morning, but I went to sleep instead just in case the paper might still be a little damp. I am really pleased with the outcome, and with Cobalt Teal - gosh that is just the cleanest, prettiest teal-blue I have ever seen. All the M Graham paints I tried here were like that though, just… really vivid and clear.
The little white dots were made with frisket, and I almost forgot to pick them off. I only noticed because I was like wait.. browngreen spot on the watercan? mmmm…..
Next up… bonefishes maybe!

alliebirdseed:

All done!

I was so excited to get the tape off this morning, but I went to sleep instead just in case the paper might still be a little damp. I am really pleased with the outcome, and with Cobalt Teal - gosh that is just the cleanest, prettiest teal-blue I have ever seen. All the M Graham paints I tried here were like that though, just… really vivid and clear.

The little white dots were made with frisket, and I almost forgot to pick them off. I only noticed because I was like wait.. browngreen spot on the watercan? mmmm…..

Next up… bonefishes maybe!